Carl Johan Erikson

Cooking action at Avenyn and Fotobok Gbg, Göteborg 2016. Foto: Hendrik Zeitler
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10°C - Recept från Forsmarks skärgård

10°C – Recipes from the archipelago of Forsmark

An art of cooking of the second degree in the new realm of (un)sustainability.

Artists and authors Carl Johan Erikson and Karin Willén both have country houses in northern Uppland, near Forsmark nuclear power plant. For some time, they have in a series of artistic actions cooked and served fish from the area. The fish have been hauled out of the sea in the proximity of the cooling water outlet of the power plant. The higher water temperature at the outlet, 10°C above surrounding waters, have evident effects on the ecosystems: The metabolism of the fish increases, likewise the strains on their inner organs. Ongoing research poses questions such as: Does also genetic mutations take place as a result of the manipulated water temperature? And are consequently evolutionary leaps already present?

Twelve recipes from the cooking actions are presented in this mutant cook book, which in addition contains documentations of a cooling water diving ritual and a text of Jesper Olsson. He writes: “One of the photographies display a more compact green, almost artificial. As if the photosynthesis has gone wrong.” He continues: “The vague alarm this evokes, together with the blithe and sense of purposedeness typical for the genre of cook booking, characterize Eriksons and Willéns compilation of recipes. An art of cooking of the second degree you might call it. As opposed to the interventions in nature which once separated cooked from raw and thus laid down a structure for culture and nature, this is an art which seeks to upheave differences – or at any rate seeks to investigate and reflect upon their (un)sustainability today.“

See the book online:

https://indd.adobe.com/view/57d2e297-9f9b-4ea6-9e3d-e53a7e591d30


Read more: http://www.jonbrunbergforlag.se/article/2/10-C-Recept-fr-n-Forsmarks-sk-rg-rd

https://www.kkh.se/research/artistic-development-projects/10c-a-macroscopic-exploration/